After 18 months of deliberation, the European Parliament's Special Committee on Artificial Intelligence in a Digital Age (AIDA) has adopted its final recommendations, giving some key pointers on EU policy and regulation of AI over the next decade. It will go to the EP soon for full approval. 

Notable and welcome recommendations include a suggested lighter-touch regime for AI delivered B2B, where normal contractual protections play as big a role as heavy-handed regulation, as well as further detail on the place that AI risk assessments will - and won't - have in providing assurance.

As interesting though, is the broader geopolitical picture that AIDA has painted around the approach to global AI use and regulation. We don't need to look too far afield right now to understand the very different directions AI could be taken, and that only heightens the need for common global minimum standards to be firmly established, whether that's driven by the EU, US, UK or a combined effort.